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Child with Diabetes
 
 
Caring for a Child with Diabetes
Your child can live a normal life – yes, normal – as long as you, your family, and others learn to help manage his or her blood sugar (glucose) levels. Your household will just have a different definition of “normal.”  When blood sugar levels are well controlled, your son or daughter can do anything anyone else does. Kids with diabetes ride bikes, play sports, swim, dance, date, grow up, get married, have children, grow old, have grandchildren – just like everyone else.
You will learn to balance healthful eating, exercise, monitoring blood glucose levels, and adjust insulin as you go with the help of your doctor and diabetes educator.  A bonus is that you may also improve the whole family’s health with the lifestyle changes you will make in your household because of your child's diabetes.
 
 
Your Principal or local board of education can tell you the diabetes care policies of your child's school. School administrators, nurses, teachers, bus drivers, coaches, and food service personnel play important roles in helping to make your child's efforts successful. By taking an active role, you can make sure that your child gets the care he or she needs at school.

Areas where school policies differ include: 
  • Whether or not students are allowed to test their blood sugar levels in the classroom, gymnasium or cafeteria
  • Locations in the school where insulin injections may be given
  • Storage areas in the school where diabetes supplies can be kept
  • The amount of diabetes management education to be given to school personnel
  • The amount of assistance and participation to be provided by school personnel in diabetes care
  • Rules regarding the disposal of syringes, pen needles and lancets
In its policy statement concerning the care of children with diabetes in the school or day care setting, the American Diabetes Association states that schools and day care providers should provide the following:
1.     All adults who provide education or care for the student should be trained on the symptoms and treatment of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. An adult and back-up adult should be trained to 1) perform fingerstick blood glucose monitoring and record the results, 2) take appropriate actions for blood glucose levels outside of the target range indicated in the student's care plan, and 3) test the urine or blood for ketones, when necessary, and respond to the results of this test.
2.     Immediate accessibility to the treatment of hypoglycemia by a knowledgeable adult. The student should remain supervised until appropriate treatment has been administered, and the treatment should be available as close as possible to the student's location.
3.     A location in the school to provide privacy during testing and insulin administration, if desired by the student and family. Permission for the student to check his or her blood glucose level and to take appropriate action to treat hypoglycemia in the classroom or anywhere the student is in conjunction with a school activity.
4.     Permission for the student to see school medical personnel upon request.
5.     Permission for the student to eat a snack anywhere, including the classroom or the school bus, if necessary to prevent or treat hypoglycemia.
6.     Permission to miss school without consequences for required medical appointments to monitor the student's diabetes management. This should be an excused absence with a doctor's note, if required by usual school policy.
7.     Permission for the student to use the restroom and have access to fluids such as water, as necessary.
8.     An appropriate location for insulin and/or glucagons storage, if necessary.
 
 
 There are a few things that you will need to learn, such as:
  • What happens in your child's body when he or she eats or drinks
  • How to monitor the child's blood glucose levels
  • Signs and treatment of high and low blood glucose levels
  • Your child's blood glucose target range (your doctor will tell you)
  • How to give insulin
  • How to plan meals, snacks and count carbohydrates
  • How to balance food, exercise, and insulin
  • How to work with your child's diabetes health care team
As a parent you must address physical, mental and emotional concerns. Diabetes can sometimes affect the stages that your child goes through as he or she grows and develops, such as issues with independence or separation anxiety.
You may need to help your child deal with feelings of being different from others because of diabetes.

 

The Child's Responsibilities                                                                                  
You can help a child with diabetes by setting some reasonable expectations of what diabetes management tasks the child can and should handle.
 
Grade Level
Diabetes Care Tasks
 
Day care and Pre-school
The child is unable to perform diabetes tasks alone. By age four, can participate in some tasks.
 
Elementary school
The child should participate in all diabetes tasks. By age eight, can perform finger-stick blood glucose tests with supervision.
 
Middle school or junior high
The child should be able to do blood glucose tests under normal circumstances (i.e. when not experiencing low blood sugar). By age 13, can inject insulin with supervision.
 
High school
The child should be able to do blood glucose tests under normal circumstances (i.e. when not experiencing low blood sugar). Can inject insulin with supervision.
 
 
Caring for a Child with Diabetes
Your child can live a normal life – yes, normal – as long as you, your family, and others learn to help manage his or her blood sugar (glucose) levels. Your household will just have a different definition of “normal.”  When blood sugar levels are well controlled, your son or daughter can do anything anyone else does. Kids with diabetes ride bikes, play sports, swim, dance, date, grow up, get married, have children, grow old, have grandchildren – just like everyone else.
You will learn to balance healthful eating, exercise, monitoring blood glucose levels, and adjust insulin as you go with the help of your doctor and diabetes educator.  A bonus is that you may also improve the whole family’s health with the lifestyle changes you will make in your household because of your child's diabetes.
 
 
Your Principal or local board of education can tell you the diabetes care policies of your child's school. School administrators, nurses, teachers, bus drivers, coaches, and food service personnel play important roles in helping to make your child's efforts successful. By taking an active role, you can make sure that your child gets the care he or she needs at school.

Areas where school policies differ include: 
  • Whether or not students are allowed to test their blood sugar levels in the classroom, gymnasium or cafeteria
  • Locations in the school where insulin injections may be given
  • Storage areas in the school where diabetes supplies can be kept
  • The amount of diabetes management education to be given to school personnel
  • The amount of assistance and participation to be provided by school personnel in diabetes care
  • Rules regarding the disposal of syringes, pen needles and lancets
In its policy statement concerning the care of children with diabetes in the school or day care setting, the American Diabetes Association states that schools and day care providers should provide the following:
1.     All adults who provide education or care for the student should be trained on the symptoms and treatment of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. An adult and back-up adult should be trained to 1) perform fingerstick blood glucose monitoring and record the results, 2) take appropriate actions for blood glucose levels outside of the target range indicated in the student's care plan, and 3) test the urine or blood for ketones, when necessary, and respond to the results of this test.
2.     Immediate accessibility to the treatment of hypoglycemia by a knowledgeable adult. The student should remain supervised until appropriate treatment has been administered, and the treatment should be available as close as possible to the student's location.
3.     A location in the school to provide privacy during testing and insulin administration, if desired by the student and family. Permission for the student to check his or her blood glucose level and to take appropriate action to treat hypoglycemia in the classroom or anywhere the student is in conjunction with a school activity.
4.     Permission for the student to see school medical personnel upon request.
5.     Permission for the student to eat a snack anywhere, including the classroom or the school bus, if necessary to prevent or treat hypoglycemia.
6.     Permission to miss school without consequences for required medical appointments to monitor the student's diabetes management. This should be an excused absence with a doctor's note, if required by usual school policy.
7.     Permission for the student to use the restroom and have access to fluids such as water, as necessary.
8.     An appropriate location for insulin and/or glucagons storage, if necessary.
 
 
 There are a few things that you will need to learn, such as:
  • What happens in your child's body when he or she eats or drinks
  • How to monitor the child's blood glucose levels
  • Signs and treatment of high and low blood glucose levels
  • Your child's blood glucose target range (your doctor will tell you)
  • How to give insulin
  • How to plan meals, snacks and count carbohydrates
  • How to balance food, exercise, and insulin
  • How to work with your child's diabetes health care team
As a parent you must address physical, mental and emotional concerns. Diabetes can sometimes affect the stages that your child goes through as he or she grows and develops, such as issues with independence or separation anxiety.
You may need to help your child deal with feelings of being different from others because of diabetes.

 

The Child's Responsibilities                                                                                  
You can help a child with diabetes by setting some reasonable expectations of what diabetes management tasks the child can and should handle.
 
Grade Level
Diabetes Care Tasks
 
Day care and Pre-school
The child is unable to perform diabetes tasks alone. By age four, can participate in some tasks.
 
Elementary school
The child should participate in all diabetes tasks. By age eight, can perform finger-stick blood glucose tests with supervision.
 
Middle school or junior high
The child should be able to do blood glucose tests under normal circumstances (i.e. when not experiencing low blood sugar). By age 13, can inject insulin with supervision.
 
High school
The child should be able to do blood glucose tests under normal circumstances (i.e. when not experiencing low blood sugar). Can inject insulin with supervision.

 

 



 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

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